Letter 4
NEPHEW WHO IS HAPPY TO BE A GIRL
(From Justice Weekly)
Contributed by Fluffy
Dear Miss MacDonald,

I just discovered your wonderful e-magazine 'Petticoat Discipline Monthly', and just had to write you to say, bravo! I also want to thank you, and wish you well in your efforts on behalf of all the members of the petticoat community.

I am attaching a letter from 'Justice Weekly' for you to publish at the end of this note. I find it rather interesting in that the writer approaches the subject of petticoat discipline from a rather different perspective. She maintains that petticoating is, or can be, a positive life influence on special boys, the transgenderd ones, who are truly in need of a woman's education.

My life would have been so much easier if I had been taught how be a lady and get along in life as a woman. Everything would have made sense to me. Still, I found my way. Thanks to the help of some very perceptive and loving women, I embraced my femaleness, and now wear my skirts with pride and power. I am quite sure the magazine and its attendant mail keep you very busy, but I would love to correspond with you if you are so inclined.
Sincerely,

Fluffy

From 'Justice Weekly'

Dear Sir:

This is my first letter to your little paper. I am prompted to write by an article signed by 'Ruth' in a recent issue of 'Justice', which I would like to respond to.

I am surprised by the animus she displays in promoting 'petticoat discipline' on one so-called 'panty-waist' who is the husband of a friend of hers. It appears to me that his 'petticoat training' would have more meaning if it was applied in -- and accepted in -- a pleasurable frame of mind by the captive, rather than by the vindictiveness of the method 'Ruth' proposes to employ for those she thinks should be put in dresses. Deserving as it may be, giving this male the 'petticoat treatment' in this manner is certainly a humiliating action for one whose only weakness is that of a proper male character seemingly lacking. 'Ruth's' plan for this man's subjugation is one without compassion, and at variance with the feminisation program I carried out with my own nephew. Mine has the more humanitarian aspect of having the male captive of feminine allure consciously, and willingly, accept the female concept of things in a free manner.

In the case of my nephew it has worked out well. He is now living and working as a female from choice, not from the humiliating type of measures that 'Ruth' would employ. I maintain, that those measures only create a nonentity of a man.

My nephew, Claire's, fancy for silks and satins commenced from an incident in his final collegiate year when he was asked to fill a vacancy in an all-girl orchestra which had been making a name for itself with it's musical nights locally, and in out of town engagements, as a girl. He had made his home with me since his parents died when he was 14. I had come to look at him as something of a replacement for my married daughter who lived in western Canada, and who only got to visit me a few times since she had moved away with her husband. Up to then my nephew had been prominent in cadet life, football and hockey.

When Claire informed me what the orchestra girls had asked of him, I merely smiled and enquired: 'Are girls with musical talent that scarce?' I didn't' tell him that two of the girls had come to me to secure my acceptance of their idea before they asked him. The idea of replacing my daughter with Claire appealed to the 'something new' aspect in me, although I did have some reservations. I felt sure he would make an excellent female impersonator, as Claire possessed a good figure, and good looks, and he was also an excellent pianist and cornetist. Believing the orchestra would be a good outlet for his musical talents I consented, and asked the girls to let me tag along as a sort of wardrobe mistress for Claire as well as the others, which they were happy to do.

My duties proved quite enjoyable, and all pangs of conscience dissipated as I witnessed Claire doing and looking so well as a pianist with the all-girl troupe. Each member was always attired similarly, and they created a lovely view in their cocktail length gowns. Another costume that the audiences really liked them in, because of the more girlish appeal they provided, was being attired in white pleated dresses, with a Chanel-style blue jacket with white borders.

During two years of orchestral routine Claire developed a feminine fervor in his life. The way he acclimated to his silk and satin dresses was so noticeable I began to plan his future as a woman, as he would not always be with the orchestra. At my urging he successfully passed business courses in secretarial and bookkeeping. I further added to his wifely abilities by teaching Claire the arts of cooking and sewing. 'She' has adopted herself so well to a young ladies' life that she now lives everyday as a female, and is employed in the office of two scientists, recording their findings and attending to their business mail.

How much better, I ask you, is Claire's situation and outlook because of the treatment the orchestra girls and I gave my nephew, than that meted out by 'Ruth' to the sadly disillusioned male captive she has.
Thanking you for the space, I am,
Yours sincerely,

Anna Marie

Fluffy has sent in a letter from the 1940s or 50s about a boy who really wanted to be a girl. That might seem to be a bit removed from the subject matter of 'Petticoat Discipline Monthly' but I do agree with Fluffy that for those boys who feel that they fully belong as a member of the opposite sex, petticoating can be enormously beneficial. The boyhood in such cases is so often one of intolerable misery and frustration, and I am glad to hear that Fluffy has come through those years successfully, and is now much happier with life. As the author of the letter states, petticoat discipline requires compassion and affection to be successful.
Susan


(A Classic Reprint from our March 2001 Issue.)

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Letter 5